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Visit to the Little Mermaid Statue in Copenhagen: how to get there, prices and advice


Among the main features of Copenhagen is the historical-architectural diversity of its monuments. The urban fabric in fact collects a perfect mix of modern buildings of great impact (such as the Royal Library, also nicknamed the Black Diamond for the structure made of glass panels) and other more traditional ones, linked to the vast background of legends and fairy tales of Nordic literature. .

One of these is certainly the famous Little Mermaid statue, made of bronze and visited every day by thousands of people, recalled by an ancient Danish fairy tale now known all over the world. In this article, we explain how to reach it, also leaving you some advice that can help you.



Index

  1. Where is it and how to get there
  2. Hours and prices
  3. Tours, guided tours and tickets online
  4. Useful tips for visiting the attraction
  5. Historical notes, curiosities and practical info: what to know in brief
  6. User questions and comments

Where is it and how to get there

  • On foot: easily from the historic center. It is located in the north, in the area of ​​the seafront overlooking the newly built port. The street is Langelinie, Kobenhavn, 20 minutes walk from Nyvatn Harbor - Get directions
  • By bus: n. 27 to Indiakaj stop, then about 5 minutes on foot to the statue
  • On a boat: the pier closest to the statue is Nordre Toldbod, served by boats 991 and 992 which stop along the main canal
  • By metro: lines M3 and M4 to Osterport station, then 10 minutes on foot to the statue
  • By train: Lines A, B, C, E, H to Osterport station, then 10 minutes on foot to the statue

Hours and prices

  • the Little Mermaid is outdoors, there are no timetables. If you travel in the autumn / winter period, take into account the hours of light and darkness, which in late winter can be reduced to 4-5 per day
  • When to visit: early in the morning it is less crowded, but at sunset the shots are certainly more beautiful
  • free

Tours, guided tours and tickets online

Useful tips for visiting the attraction

  1. Get up early: the ideal would be to reach the statue by 10:00 in the morning to avoid the crowds of tourists
  2. Minimum time: Actually, the statue is nice but quite small and it won't steal you more than a few minutes
  3. Arm yourself with patience: taking photos of the Little Mermaid without a tourist nearby is not at all easy. Armed with a lot of patience, especially in the case of visiting school groups and / or organized groups

Historical notes, curiosities and practical info: what to know in brief

The statue of the Little Mermaid (Den lille Havfrue in Danish) is the work of E. Eriksen and depicts a mermaid (a mythological creature that has always been part of Nordic culture) made of bronze.

The statue is positioned on a rock, with an absorbed and slightly melancholy gaze turned towards the sea, in reference to the fairy tale of the writer Andersen that sees it as the protagonist. However, not everyone knows that the dimensions of the Little Mermaid are quite small, so much so that at first glance many are not able to identify it: the sculpture, in fact, is large. just over 1 meter and 25 cm, for a weight of about 175kg.

Despite the initial "disappointment" for the smallness of the statue, however, we advise you to go beyond the first impact by dwelling on the creature's gaze and trying to grasp its contrasting emotions: the sculpture is in fact endowed with an incredible humanity, which can be caught only by those who can really look at it, isolating themselves from the chatter and constant flashes of the cameras.
Furthermore, in the vicinity of the statue, the Citadel of Kastellet is another very interesting area of ​​the capital that deserves to be visited.

The construction of the statue was commissioned in 1909 by Carl Jacobsen, son of the founder of Carlsberg beer (much loved in Denmark), who was very impressed by the story of the Little Mermaid, represented on stage at the Royal Theater. The work was then created by the sculptor E. Eriksen, who was inspired by the etoile of the Copenhagen theater for the face of the mythological creature. However, since the actress refused to pose nude, it seems that Eriksen was inspired by his wife for the body of the Little Mermaid.



  1. The only time the statue was removed from its natural pedestal was in 2010, when it was moved to Shanghai for the Universal Exhibition. In its place, a copy of the Little Mermaid was placed, usually found in the TiFlights Gardens.
  2. In total, there are more than 13 copies of the Little Mermaid to the world, many of which are located in the United States. There are actually two in Copenhagen too: one in TiFlights Gardens and one at the capital's airport.
  3. Eriksen sculpted the sea creature at the exact moment of its metamorphosis: this is why the statue does not have the unique tail, typical of mermaids in the water, but one begins to glimpse the appearance of the two human legs.
  4. On more than one occasion the Little Mermaid has been the victim of vandalism: beheaded, smeared, covered with a burqua and thrown into the sea, it is one of the most attacked monuments in the world.
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