The most absurd superstitions around the world

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Joel Fulleda
@joelfulleda
SOURCES CONSULTED:

wikipedia.org, lonelyplanet.com

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All countries have their own superstitions, some more ingrained than others. Here are the most "crazy" in which you can come across.

If you are a real traveler and intend to reach an unknown country, outside your national borders, you will have to immerse yourself in the culture of the place, letting yourself be intrigued by the local superstitions. These are widespread almost everywhere, even turning out to be crazy to the ears of a foreigner.


In India, for example, it is believed to be bad call someone back about to leave the house. It is therefore necessary to say everything necessary before someone reaches the door of the house. In Italy, on the other hand, it is known that many keep their distance from number 17 but few know why. In Roman numerals the representation would be like this: XVII. It was believed that this was the anagram of VIXI, therefore "I lived", an elegant way to indicate death. And if the 17th of the month were to happen on a Friday, all activities would be suspended, a bit like in America it is customary (if you are superstitious) to Friday 13. The numerological question is widespread everywhere, and so in China it is the four, also in this case for a graphic connection to the word that indicates death. Many buildings even tend to avoid this number, as in hotels, which go from room three to room five.


In Norway, on the other hand, there is a tendency to reverse the sense of curses. Generally, “tvi tvi” is repeated to anyone who is leaving, so as to keep evil spirits away from him. If in America, on the other hand, we tend to stay away from black cats, just as in Italy, in England the opposite is true, considering them bringers of luck. Flying in Japan instead you will find yourself with hotels that provide for a precise bed arrangement. In fact, the pillows will never have to point north, which is believed to shorten life. Returning instead to talking about those who enter and leave a place, in Romania it is believed that both gestures must necessarily be made through the same door. A possible secondary exit would bring bad luck.



Very often the superstition is linked to some religious fears, as in Portugal, where there is a tendency not to walk backwards. Such a gesture, even if only a few steps to make room for others at the exit of the metro, is considered by many to be a clear invitation to Satan to follow his own path.



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